McDonald Law Firm Reviewing Essure Birth Control Device Cases

In the wake of a nationwide movement to recall the Essure birth control device, the McDonald Law Firm is evaluating cases in which women were irreparably harmed by this controversial permanent contraceptive.

The Fort Worth-based firm, which has taken on some of the world’s largest pharmaceutical and medical device manufactures, has established a website and is evaluating the best course of action for women who have suffered unwanted hysterectomies, unintended pregnancies, perforated organs and debilitating pain from the Essure device.

In June, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced that it would review the safety and effectiveness of Essure after receiving more than 5,000 complaints about the device, which is also being blamed for fetal deaths in women who became pregnant and adult deaths reportedly caused by infection, organ tears and other complications.

The FDA is convening a public meeting with its Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices advisory panel on Sept. 24 to discuss the risks and benefits of Essure and has invited feedback from experts, panel members and the public.

Essure ― which according to the FDA was initially manufactured and marketed by Conceptus, a company now owned by Bayer HealthCare ― is the only permanent birth control device in the United States. Tiny metal coils are implanted into each of the woman’s fallopian tubes. Over the next three months, scar tissue gradually form around the coils, blocking sperm from reaching a woman’s eggs.

The device has been implanted in more than 750,000 women worldwide. Now, thousands of those women are rallying against the device and demanding its removal from the market.

The McDonald Law Firm has a long history of medical device litigation experience and has successfully represented thousands of clients who have suffered grievous injuries because of defective devices and drugs, including hip implants, transvaginal mesh, silicone breast implants, Fen/phen, Baycol and Vioxx.

Ten Back-To-Back Royalty Trials Set Against Chesapeake

FORT WORTH – Chesapeake Energy is facing 10 back-to-back civil trials next year in Tarrant and Johnson Counties, stemming from lawsuits filed by the McDonald Law Firm on behalf of North Texas royalty owners.

This week, State District Judge Dana Womack set nine more cases against the energy giant for trial, bringing the total number to 10. The judge scheduled one trial each month beginning in February 2016 and running through November 2016. Two trials are set in Tarrant County; the other eight are set in Johnson County.

The first 10 trial dates are the beginning of what is expected to be a hard-fought legal battle between Chesapeake and thousands of gas royalty owners who claim Chesapeake deliberately cheated them out of royalties.

The Fort Worth-based McDonald Law Firm represents more than 22,000 gas royalty owners across the country, including over 16,000 in Texas. To date, the firm has filed nearly 300 lawsuits against Chesapeake ― 250 on behalf of Barnett Shale clients in Tarrant and Johnson counties. The lawsuits allege breach of contract, among other things, and also name co-defendants, including Total E&P USA, based in Houston.

The McDonald Law Firm contends that Chesapeake Energy has underpaid gas royalty owners by several hundred million dollars.

In an effort to streamline the mass litigation against Chesapeake, a state judicial panel appointed Judge Womack, of Tarrant County, to oversee pretrial decisions and set trial dates for Barnett Shale cases filed by the McDonald Law Firm. Once the legal issues are decided, Womack sends the cases to other courts for trials or final dispositions.

The first 10 trials will be presided over by eight district court judges, including The Honorable Dana Womack, Melody Wilkinson, Wade Birdwell, Donald Cosby, John Chupp, Mark Pittman, Susan McCoy and Thomas Lowe.

The McDonald Law Firm represents small and large property owners and continues to file lawsuits on their behalf weekly against Chesapeake Energy.

 

Trial Date Set for Tarrant County Royalty Suit Against Chesapeake

FORT WORTH – The first of hundreds of North Texas royalty lawsuits filed against Chesapeake Energy by the McDonald Law Firm has been set for trial early next year in Tarrant County.

State District Judge Dana Womack set the trial for February 22, 2016, setting the stage for what is expected to be a hard-fought battle between Chesapeake Energy and thousands of gas royalty owners who claim the energy giant deliberately cheated them out of royalties.

The 30-page lawsuit – which was filed on behalf of a Tarrant County property owner – alleges breach of contract, among other things. It also names several other co-defendants, including Total E&P USA, based out of Houston.

The Fort Worth-based McDonald Law Firm represents nearly 11,000 Texas gas royalty owners. In an effort to streamline the mass litigation against Chesapeake, a state judicial panel appointed Judge Womack, of Tarrant County, to oversee pretrial decisions and set trial dates for Barnett Shale cases filed by the McDonald Law Firm. Once the legal issues are decided, Womack will send the cases to other courts for trials or final disposition.

The first Tarrant County case set for trial next year will be presided over by State District Judge Melody Wilkinson.

The Tarrant County trial date is just the latest movement in the McDonald Law Firm’s massive litigation against Chesapeake. The firm currently represents nearly 20,000 gas royalty owners across the country and has filed 280 lawsuits against Chesapeake in Tarrant, Johnson, Dallas and Harris counties, as well as in various Oklahoma courts.

Most of the litigation stems from Texas, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania and Louisiana – states with some of the country’s biggest shale plays. The McDonald Law Firm contends that Chesapeake Energy and its subsidiaries have underpaid gas royalty owners in each shale several hundred million dollars.

In a recent hearing in Tarrant County, the firm’s founder, Dan McDonald, asked Judge Womack to start setting cases for trial as soon as possible. Chesapeake, meanwhile, requested a delay of nearly a year.

Connie Squiers Named Partner of McDonald Law Firm

McDonald Law Firm is pleased to announce that Connie Squiers has been made Partner of the firm. Connie attended Texas Tech University where she received both her B.A. and J.D. She currently oversees McDonald Law Firm’s rapidly growing Social Security Disability department.

Trial Date Set for Louisiana Royalty Lawsuit Against Chesapeake

FORT WORTH, Texas – The first Louisiana royalty lawsuit filed against Chesapeake Energy by the McDonald Law Firm has been set for trial next year in Houston.

State District Judge Brent Gamble set the trial for April 4, 2016, paving the way for what is expected to be a hard-fought battle between Chesapeake Energy and Louisiana gas royalty owners who claim the energy giant cheated them out of royalties.

The 25-page lawsuit ― which was filed in February on behalf of a DeSoto Parish property owner ― alleges breach of contract and fraud, among other things. The Fort Worth-based McDonald Law Firm, which represents nearly 2,500 Louisiana gas royalty owners, is expected to file at least 10 more lawsuits against Chesapeake this week on behalf of clients with royalty rights in the Haynesville Shale.

The first Louisiana lawsuit was filed in Harris County because Chesapeake’s co-defendants – which include Freeport-McMorRan Oil & Gas (FMOG), PXP Louisiana Operations, LLC and PXP Louisiana Operations LLC – have their principal place of business in Houston, the county seat of Harris County. The co-defendants are also named in the lawsuit.

The Harris County trial date is the latest movement in the McDonald Law Firm’s mass litigation against Chesapeake. The firm currently represents more than 20,000 gas royalty owners across the country ― more than any other firm ― and has filed nearly 170 lawsuits.

Most of the litigation stems from Texas, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania and Louisiana ― states with some of the country’s biggest shale plays. The lawsuits allege Chesapeake Energy and its subsidiaries have underpaid gas royalty owners in each shale several hundred million dollars.